Faryl’s Fabulous Gluten-Free Granola Growlers

Irving Farm Coffee Granola Growlers

We’re thrilled to unveil our beautiful, refillable granola growlers, available for purchase at any of our Manhattan cafes. You can take home our homemade gluten-free granola—a crunchy dream featuring pecan halves and toasted coconut—in a stylish 14.5 oz. Weck Jar for $16. (And you can bring your empty jar back for a $3 discount on a refill.)

There’s nothing better than discovering talent within the Irving “Farmily” and helping employees develop new ways to shine. Read on to discover how an Irving Farm regular turned bad fortune into a delicious opportunity and became a self-made baking success!
Irving Farm Coffee Granola Growler

Faryl Amadeus did not grow up in the kitchen. Born in Kentucky and adopted into a liberal Jewish family in Brooklyn (she likens her father to Columbo), she danced with the Joffrey Ballet as a child before studying visual arts at New York’s esteemed LaGuardia High School. A lead role in A Chorus Line led her to NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts where she trained at the Experimental Theatre Wing and the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art in London. At this point, baking was the furthest thing from her mind.

Flash forward to the last couple of years. Faryl was cast by Lynne Ramsay, one of the most admired young directors in international cinema, to portray a bad guy (and a boy) in a major film starring Natalie Portman. The production fell apart in spectacular fashion. Actors dropped out. Scripts were rewritten. Directors got replaced. Faryl’s role was cut, so she returned to New York, heartbroken and needing to figure out employment. Her husband (a TV writer whom she detested when they were kids but wound up marrying after four proposals) had been working out of our 79th Street cafe where they were neighborhood regulars. When she overheard that an employee was leaving, she jumped at the opportunity and wound up making sandwiches and baking biscuits with almost no prior experience.

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Around this time, Faryl decided to adopt a strict gluten-free diet as an experiment. One day, she was craving granola, so she researched multiple recipes, mulled over the science of taste and texture, dreamed up her ideal flavor combination, and wound up crafting some of the tastiest granola in NYC. She was so pleased with the results (as were the customers) she expanded her gluten-free explorations into a whole line of sweet treats, including the most decadent, slap-yo-mama-delicious dark chocolate brownies ever.

Irving Farm Coffee Granola Growlers

Photo courtesy of @farylamadeus on Instagram.

And the baking provided a welcome contrast to the ups and downs of a career in the arts. There’s a meditative quality to mixing the ingredients (beauty tip: Faryl uses the granola’s wet mixture as a moisturizer and exfoliant) and an instant gratification to having people enjoy her product (especially parents of gluten-free children). She can audition during the day and bake in the evening. Eventually she’d love to have an open bakery space where she can work while interacting with customers.

If you don’t catch her at the 79th Street cafe running up the stairs while balancing six trays of granola, or on the soccer field representing Irving Farm in the Coffee Kickball League, she just might be upstate where she and her husband are building a house on an old dairy farm. The Faryl Amadeus Adventure Train just won’t quit!

Faryl Amadeus Irving Farm Coffee Granola Growlers

Photo courtesy of @farylamadeus on Instagram.

Perhaps a serving of her granola will give you the extra pep to have your own adventures. Life has a funny way of opening unexpected doors. It’s up to us to dance on through.

Slowing Down and Cooling Down With Slow Food NYC

Slow Food NYC at Irving Farm Training Lab

We who love coffee know that without food, there would be no coffee, because we all would have starved to death. Sustainable food, then, goes hand in hand with sustainable coffee, and it was with excited hearts that we welcomed our friends at Slow Food NYC to our Flatiron training lab last Monday for a hot summer night that was all about staying cool.

Slow Food NYC at Irving Farm Training Lab

We led a class of 14 Slow Foodies on a guided adventure of cold brewing, icy pouring-over, and of course…cool coffee cocktails, all based on our summery sweet Amaro Gayo coffee from Ethiopia.

Slow Food NYC at Irving Farm Training Lab

This was our first time teaming up with Slow Food NYC…and definitely not our last. We’re looking forward to more collabos and classes in the future, and we’ll be sure to let you know.

In the meantime, here’s a peek at our night with Teresa, Josh and Angelika schoolin’ Slow Food on cool coffee.
Iced Pour-Over (Japanese-style)
Cold Brew (24 hours)
Affogato (espresso over fresh ice cream)
Amaro Gayo Egg Cream (espresso, chocolate & vanilla syrups shaken and topped with soda water)
Purple Reign (Amaro Gayo, Aperol orange bitters, dry vermouth, grapefruit. Served neat or over ice.)
Espresso & Clouds (espresso over citrus simple syrup foam)

Slow Food NYC at Irving Farm Training Lab

We had a blast cooling off these true food enthusiasts, and can’t wait to start warming up for the next class soon!

Chilling With The Pantry in Cold Spring, NY

 

The Pantry in Cold Spring New York

Coffee, to us, is about exposure. Exposure to a broad variety of cultures, flavors, people and ways of working. Our friends upstate at The Pantry in Cold Spring are right on our level: they, too, embrace the spirit of variety and community all wrapped up in the delicious flavors of every kind of beverage. We sat down with The Pantry’s Samantha Lutzer to talk about coffee, indoor cycling, popping up and what it’s like to brew in the Hudson Valley.

Tell us about the Pantry. What were you hoping to bring to the Cold Spring community?

The mid-Hudson Valley is home to many former NYC dwellers who are part of the great northern migration to the Hudson Valley. They have very demanding and discerning palates, and I knew they would appreciate handcrafted artisanal coffee. Unlike my first shop in Brooklyn, which was single roaster-oriented, I wanted to bring a library of some of my favorite roasters that I enjoyed when I lived in the city. Right now, we have eight roasters but we’ll have three new ones soon. We also have a craft beer library with over 100 types of craft beer. You can fill up our growlers with iced coffee concentrate or beer.

Craft beer at the Pantry Cold Spring New York

When did you first get interested in coffee?

Sadly, when I had my first Frappuccino in the mid-’90s. My friends in college called me the “classic reheat” because I always had a cup of coffee in my hand. I knew I loved artisanal coffee only within the last ten years, and I decided to get more serious about it when Ost Cafe opened on my corner in the East Village. And I took training classes at Intelligentsia’s training lab in SoHo.

How did a cycling studio fit into your business plan?

The Pantry is essentially the cafe adjacent to our cross-training and spinning facility. In the city, my gym was by my office. I never had the luxury of enjoying my favorite coffee shops and the gym in the same day without a lengthy commute. Total bummer. So now I can spin, get a fresh pressed juice, and then make myself an amazing cup of coffee. #livingthedream

Tell us about the other cool spot where the Pantry is popping up.

The Pantry is co-sponsoring Bazaar-on-Hudson with the Living Room, an events space on Main Street, to bring a Brooklyn Flea-style event to the mid-Hudson Valley. It features largely Hudson Valley makers, but we have some courageous NYC artisans who come up for it. We do a multi-roaster, pop-up pour over bar, and we sell our iced coffee concentrate growlers. We did a similar program for the local farmers market in the winter, exclusively with our dear friends at Irving Farm.

The Pantry Cold Spring New York Iced Irving Farm Coffee Growler

Growlers of iced Irving Farm coffee concentrate for sale by The Pantry at Bazaar on Hudson, via Instagram.

Do you really handcraft each individual cup of coffee?

At the space in Brooklyn, we handcrafted French Press, but it was challenging at times with consistency and flow. Plus, you would have a super beautiful coffee, but you can’t get a lot of range on a French Press, no matter if you do a three or four-minute brew, agitate or not agitate, clean the crema, etc. When I was opening The Pantry, I wanted to stay true to my purist ideals and only do handcrafted coffee, but I wanted to experience the coffee more. Teresa at Irving Farm understood my commitment and worked with me to find the right pour over method for our needs. We do every single cup of coffee as a pour over using flat bottom drippers, including iced coffee. I actually can’t even drink French Press or iced coffee from a Toddy enjoyably. It all tastes the same, which is a shame for how unique the coffees are.

What Irving Farm coffee are you currently most excited about?

Our community generally prefers pretty comfortable flavor profiles as pour overs, so what I am excited about is not always the same as what they are excited about. We generally get less requests for fruit-forward, brighter coffees, so we sneak them in as iced coffee or on the espresso bar so we can prove the naysayers wrong. We have had a lot of different Irving Farm coffees in all year. The chocolaty, round ones are an easy sell, but I really loved the oaky Rwanda when we had it (it destroyed as an iced pour-over), and we are currently finishing up Amaro Gayo from Ethiopia.

Anything else you want to add?

Yes, I’d love for the owners of Anthropologie to come see The Pantry. It’s my dream to have one of my stores in every one of their major urban locations.

Thank you, Samantha! See you at the Bazaar on Hudson or at your beautiful cafe very soon!

In the Kitchen: Karys Logue, Pastry Chef, Tessa NYC



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In our recurring series In the Kitchen, we sit down with the restaurateurs and culinary pros who’ve partnered with Irving Farm to find out more about their inspirations—and of course, their feelings about coffee. In this installment, our newest Irving Farmer Josh Littlefield—pastry-lover, ice-cream connoisseur, and coffee expert, speaks with Karys Logue, Pastry Chef at Tessa, one of the most exciting new additions to the Upper West Side fine dining landscape. Here’s what Josh found out about the story behind Tessa’s inspired dessert program, and Logue own path to pastry.

Chef Logue almost led a very different life. In high school, she was drawn to the hard sciences, and had been accepted to Brown University’s neuroscience program. But in the months leading to graduation, she noticed she was finding more enjoyment baking for the study groups she had organized, rather than actually studying her soon-to-be major.

She decided to forgo her Ivy League track to follow her culinary passion, and the rest is history. Shortly after graduating from the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY, she visited New York City one Friday for what she thought would be just a day-long trial at the restaurant Daniel. After her shift, the pastry chef approached her with an offer.  She would be granted a full-time position on the condition that she began the following Monday. Karys packed her bags, and within two days transplanted into a three-year career at Daniel, working alongside the critically acclaimed Dominique Ansel, creator of the infamous Cronut (of which I am personally guilty of waiting 2 hours in the rain for on one occasion. No regrets). After Daniel, Logue spent time in Australia as the pastry chef for Sepia, consistently regarded as Australia’s finest restaurant, winning Restaurant of The Year in 2014. It was here she learned many of the modernist plating ideas and techniques that she employs today. After returning, she held the position of sous-chef and interim head pastry chef of Cafe Boulud. Recently, Karys took command as pastry chef of Tessa, developing the menu and overseeing its opening.

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What field of pastry are you most passionate about?

For most of my recent memory it has been plated desserts. The opportunity to create an experience in an à la minute way, then seeing the excitement on a customer’s face as it makes it to the table is so rewarding. It makes it pretty personal and I love it.

How did you develop the menu here at Tessa?

Seasonality, approachability, and surprise. I started by following some classical parameters—a light, fruit based dish; a chocolate-centered dessert; and then something in between. After that, seasonality is extremely important to me. Take for example the Spring Apricot Pastiche dish. I started with something as classical as a caramelized puff pastry. We then created an herbes de provence cream to tie it to the restaurant’s French and European influences. I then added the element of surprise—taking a German Halbtrocken Riesling, we created a concentrated poaching liquid to confit fresh apricots. This, paired with a micro-basil garnish gives an explosive, refreshing experience of acidity and brightness.

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Tell us about the process of creating the Irving Farm Pot de Creme—you use both the 71 Irving House Blend and our signature espresso, Blackstrap?

In the menu I wanted to have items that all customers found familiar but then add a surprising twist. For the pot de creme, you would assume it’s just coffee plus chocolate.  Starting with that familiar combination that most everyone knows I let the ingredients such as your coffee speak for themselves then add components to further express. Candied orange zest was added to bring out the coffee’s brighter notes. The darker chocolate in the cake highlights the coffee’s richness. Then, you have the heartiness from the dates complimenting the full body of the espresso, and finally floral aspects and spices from the espresso are brought out through the cardamom.

Thanks so much for your time, Karys!

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Tessa is located at 349 Amsterdam Ave, New York, New York, 10024. They’re open seven days a week for lunch and dinner with a brunch menu so delicious on weekends, it’s very likely that you may run into Josh or another member of Irving Farm enjoying their breakfast offerings—with a pot de creme chaser, of course.

 

 

Peak Organic + Irving Farm Launch Espresso Amber Ale

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As coffee people, we’re naturally drawn to those who brew—the other stuff. Imagine our delight when our friends at Peak Organic Brewing Co. in Portland, Maine, tapped us to participate in a collaborative beer. Working together with their brewers, we helped them select from our finest organic coffee offerings to home in on the key ingredient (besides beer) in their new Espresso Amber Ale.

Jon Cadoux, founder and brewer at Peak Organic, is a longtime fan of collaborating with those who produce fine organic ingredients. When looking for a coffee component for their newest brew, “we let Irving Farm handle the coffee, while we handled the beer,” Cadoux said. “We respect their commitment to deepening relationships with the growers of their beans.”

While most coffee beers tend to focus on the darker shades of coffee, ending up in heavier beers like stouts and porters, Peak Organic wanted something a little bit on the lighter side. Malty, complex, and a little fruity. We guided them towards an organic coffee we really love from the Capucas cooperative in Honduras that would harmonize wonderfully with an amber style of beer. We roasted it to bring out precisely the notes of citrus, green apple and cinnamon Cadoux fell in love with, with a firm backbone of robust, toasty espresso.

The result? Espresso Amber Ale, an absolutely delicious crossover that we can’t wait to share with you.

The beer launches this weekend to our excitement and fanfare. But somehow that didn’t seem like enough, so on Friday, March 7…we’re throwing it a party!

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We hope you’ll join us to raise a glass of Peak Organic Espresso Amber Ale at our 88 Orchard Street cafe in New York City, Friday, March 7 from 6–10pm. We’ll have food, music…and, of course, plenty of Espresso Amber Ale for you to try!

Dan Streetman on Edible Manhattan TV

We’ve always been huge fans of the Edible magazines and their coverage of our city’s constantly delicious, emerging scene, and we were honored to recently be featured in Edible Manhattan’s drinks issue, where we shared the Irving Farm story.

As a multimedia bonus, Edible Films produced this great video with our Director of Coffee, Dan Streetman, who was interviewed at our Manhattan headquarters about what his job is all about.

Creating a Coffee Blend With a Community at Table on Ten

Table on Ten, Bloomfield, NY. Photo by Ingalls Photography.

Table on Ten, Bloomfield, NY. Photo by Ingalls Photography.

Relationships make great coffee. From the farmers, to the roasters, specialty coffee folk speak reverently of relationship coffee, emphasizing the bonds that bring us closer to the origins of coffee. But there are relationships on the other side of the coffee economy, closer to the point of consumption. But once a coffee has reached our roasting facility the number of people directly engaged in fashioning a finished product—say, a new blend or a roast profile for instance—is limited. Most of our customers, as they come to understand more of the labor that goes into roasting, profiling, and blending, are satisfied to choose from the coffees on a cupping table. We seek out—and work best—with partners who are as dedicated to their crafts as we are to our coffees. And they treat our, now their, coffee the way they treat everything else on their menus. But now and then a special customer comes along who wants to go deeper into the process with us.

Photo by Ugo Aniukwu

Photos by Ugo Aniukwu

Our friends at Table on Ten in Bloomville, NY—who seem to have direct lines of communication not just with their local producers, but with the produce itself—are one team for whom buying great coffees was not enough. They expressed to us their desire to be more involved in the production of the coffee they feature in their cafe. And not just for themselves—they wanted the opportunity to involve their local community in the process, to get the whole town together to create a blend. We were admittedly scratching our heads at the prospect of formally presenting, judging, soliciting and recording public feedback on the half-dozen coffees being considered for a Table on Ten blend. Such exercises are usually conducted at the roastery or in our training lab, so we were a bit out of our comfort zone, but excited about the adventure nonetheless.

So, one Saturday in early October, Teresa von Fuchs and I drove out of Manhattan and north into the western Catskills, nervous, excited and uncertain about what we were getting into. Neither of us had been to Bloomville before. But what we walked into that night was one of the most immediately familiar and welcoming communities either of us have had the good fortune to be introduced to. We were greeted warmly as “the coffee people” about whom Inez and Julian had told them so much. We never expected our presence to be so celebrated as it was that weekend in Bloomville. We sat down to a dizzying array of five or six pizzas, each a different recipe, and each incredibly delicious. We shared our table with Julian’s neighbors Cay Sophie and Christian, and it wasn’t until the end of the meal that we realized Cay Sophie and Christian would also be our hosts for the night, after taking us to a bonfire, where we met more travelers who were also in the process of falling in love with this place.

Bewildered as we were by the welcome we received and by the wonderful sense of community crowded into this unassuming house on the side the road, we very quickly began to make sense of what Table on Ten was looking for when they asked if we’d help them and their town create their own coffee blend.

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In the morning we set up on a table taking up much of of the microshop/cafe and began brewing. Table on Ten’s only criteria for coffees to be considered were that they come from producers with whom we have strong relationships, and that their town tended to favor darker roasts, which reminded Inez of the coffees she grew up on. We had three coffees roasted with two different profiles and we brewed up batches of all six for any and all who ventured to taste.

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There were lots of opinions and votes and tasting notes and smells and stories of coffees shared and loved and longed for. There was a whole family who came in for breakfast after celebrating a son’s wedding the night before. There was a couple visiting from Holland. There were quite a few folks from the city who swore they’d have to move to Bloomville after spending a weekend in its thrall. After all the votes were tallied (maybe we weighted Inez and the Table’s teams input a little heavier…) we blended the remaining small bags of coffee and A3 blend was born.

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After much cleaning and shaking of hands, we set back out on the road. With tummies stuffed full of pizza, made from scratch, with ingredients grown by friends and family, baked in an oven built by hand, off tables made from the woods and falling-down barns nearby–we understood the meaning of relationships and local production to the very heart of the cafe, and were proud that our coffee had the extra touch of relationship-building tucked inside. In Bloomville we were reminded of the other beautiful of face of relationship coffee. For this and all our relationships in coffee, we are grateful to no end.

Pastry Chef Laurie Jon Moran on Coffee as a Dessert Ingredient

Pastry Chef Laurie Jon  Moran in the kitchen at Le Bernardin.

Pastry Chef Laurie Jon Moran in the kitchen at Le Bernardin.

In this third in a series of interviews by Irving Farm to the talented food and drink professionals we work in partnership with, we take a minute with Executive Pastry Chef Laurie Jon Moran of Le Bernardin.
How did you get started in the food and beverage industry? and What’s your role now?
I knew I wanted to be a chef when I was about 14 years old, so after high school I went to culinary school rather than college. Now I’m lucky enough to be the Executive Pastry Chef at Le Bernardin.

What led you to pastry in your career?
While I was in culinary school I enjoyed pastry more and was more attracted to it because of the precision and technicality.

Tell us more about how you use coffee in creating your dessert menu? How do the individual flavor profiles of each coffee affect how you approach them?
The approach is generally to get as much of the natural flavor profile of the coffee beans into the dessert as we can, especially the lighter more floral notes that often get lost in dessert preparations.

What’s the most successful dessert you’ve ever made incorporating coffee?
The coffee dessert that we have on the menu right now is quite popular. It’s a play on a tiramisu but with coffee being the main flavor, supported by mascarpone and salted caramel. We try to make the quality and flavor of the coffee beans the thing that makes the dessert special and infuse them into most of the components.

What coffee/s are you currently working with? What interests or excites you about them?
We are currently using beans from Los Lirios, Honduras in our coffee dessert. I love its balance and fruity acidity. It is also one of my favourite coffees as an espresso, although for me, nothing has beaten the Amaro Gayo beans from Ethiopia.

What’s been the most interesting thing you’ve learned about coffee?
I didn’t realize how unique different coffees can be and how big the range of flavor profiles is. Trying different coffees as the selections changed at the Irving Farm 79th street shop really opened my eyes to that, then doing a cupping at the training lab really blew me away.

 

Blue Hill’s Chef Dan Barber on the G9…and the Perfect Cup of Coffee

Blue Hill Chef Dan Barber

Blue Hill Chef Dan Barber

The G9 Chef’s Summit, an annual meeting of the  International Advisory Council of the Basque Culinary Center, aka nine of the world’s top chefs, met close to our home this year in Pocantico Hills, NY, at the revered Blue Hill at Stone Barns farm and restaurant. We spoke with Blue Hill chef and G9 member Dan Barber about what the meeting was all about…and how the world’s top chefs liked our coffee.

What was this year’s G9 conference all about?
This year’s G9 was about bringing together the original producers of grains and seeds together with chefs to get them to think about the products and produce we use before they even hit the field. We all think about sourcing ingredients, and the further back along the chain we go when we think about it, the better. If we get to know the people who are imagining the flavors and textures of the future, we can work together to create that future.

What thing struck you most about this years’ conference?
Mostly the recognition that we may have overlooked breeders in our pursuit to eke out specific flavors and textures. That, and the chance to facilitate the meeting of so many incredible artisans.

So we have to ask, as we talk about the specific ingredients you choose to use at Blue Hill, how does coffee fit into your master plans?
The same way it fit into the conference this year. You have a collection of incredible chefs, breeders, this room full of incredible tasters and people driven by the pursuit of great flavor and we wanted to fuel them with great flavors in their cups. In our restaurant, it’s the diners who we want to provide the best possible tastes. And when we don’t screw it up, I think that’s what we do with your coffee.

 I was really happy at this year’s conference to be able to introduce so many people to Irving Farm and the work you all do. So many people came up to me and said they couldn’t believe Irving Farm Coffee tasted like that.

What’s on your mind, and what are you most excited to work on for this coming year? In terms of seeds/your restaurant/anything?
I’m most excited for good coffee!

Here’s to that!

Read more about some of the farms Blue Hill is inspired by here on their website.

Farm to Farm Interview: Madava Farms’ Jacob Griffin

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Crown Maple and Madava Farms’ Jacob Griffin

 

In this first in a series of interviews by Irving Farm to the brilliant food and drink professionals we work in partnership with, we take a minute with Jacob Griffin, chef and Man Behind The Farm Stand at our Dutchess County, NY neighbors Crown Maple and Madava Farms.

 

Tell us about the Farm Stand at Madava Farms, and how it fits in with Crown Maple?
The Farm Stand at Madava Farms is our Café and visitor hub at the Sugarhouse. It is open year-round on weekends for lunch, tours, nature walks, private dinners and many other activities. I prepare a weekly menu utilizing our farm produce and other ingredients grown by local farms in the Hudson Valley.

The forests at Madava Farms produce our quality Crown Maple Syrup. When the sap stops running, the rest of the forest & farm come alive. We grow our own produce for The Farm Stand in our 6.5-acre chef’s garden. And just like our syrup, we work hard to produce unique and high quality fresh produce and turn it into great tasting food.

 

How did you get started in the food and beverage industry?
Like many chef stories begin, I was always cooking up my own creations at home as a child. However, mine began in the northern state of Alaska where the growing season is extremely short and the main entrée for many families is a moose-roast.

My first food and beverage position was for a catering company working front of the house my first year of college. It wasn’t long that I moved to the kitchen and started mixing baked goods and prepping food for our large events. The chef there pulled me aside one day and recommended I consider changing my major and going to culinary school.

With the help of my best friend, I applied and was accepted at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York. This is where I began a career which opened up many amazing opportunities for this Alaskan.

 

What are you most excited about/interested in about what you guys are doing at Crown Maple and the Farm Stand?
At Madava Farms, I get to combine my two favorite things: sweets and local fresh produce. For many, sweets and veggies don’t always go together right away, but our maple syrup is the perfect natural sweet balancer. And better, the veggies come from our own garden right outside of our sugarhouse. If I run out of thyme or basil, I grab some shears and head out to the garden.

 

How does coffee fit into your menu?
Coffee fits in two ways: it is the last taste and aroma the guest experiences from a farm-fresh meal. The cup must be well-balanced, flavorful and leave your palate fresh and light in order to ensure a great meal.

Second is my Crown Maple Latte. It is perfect marriage of quality espresso & great maple syrup. I serve just as many maple lattes as I do coffees during the sugaring season.

I love using Irving Farm because they share the same characteristics we have for our syrup and food: sustainability, high quality standards and support of local businesses.

 

What coffee are you currently serving?
This season I selected the Santa Isabel – Guatemala. I chose this coffee because of its fresh earthiness in the aroma and aftertaste. It pairs well with our use of farm-fresh ingredients. I am also one of those people who can smell some of the oddest things in coffee, and this particular origin, I love the subtle taste of pumpkin seeds and multi-grains.

 

Thank you, Chef Griffin!

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