Ethiopia Diaries: Part II

Irving Farm’s Coffee Director, Dan Streetman, travelled to Ethiopia earlier this year as part of his ongoing coffee journeys. Here is the second installment of his adventures.

Ethiopia Road

Lots of driving in Ethiopia!

 

Day 4

Heading back to Addis Ababa, my mind swirled with what we had encountered so far. Ethiopia was proving far more complex than even the nuance I expected to find in a country so steeped in coffee. One thing that struck me was how large the country is and how much road construction crews had laid since we drove out this direction! There must have been 200 miles of freshly paved asphalt on this road (incredible to me as it takes years to lay a few miles in New York City). However it was clear someone was very intent on investing in the infrastructure, as we must have seen 20 pieces of heavy equipment working along the way. While all the driving was drudgery, it was nice to be able to sit and process all we’d seen so far. Though I found my mind crystallizing questions more than it generated answers. Driving in Ethiopia at night proved to be a harrowing adventure—it is very dark, with the only light coming from other cars, and the road is packed with donkey carts, people, and other vehicles and creatures that have no reflective markers or lights. The rest of our drive was like a tense video game, where we were calling out to the driver to watch the donkey cart or animal as we barreled down the road heading for Addis Ababa. We arrived intact, with our knuckles slightly whiter, and agreed to work hard to stay on schedule the rest of the trip to avoid night driving, while reveling in the newly re-found luxuries of running water and pizza.

 

Day 5

Tadesi

Tadesi, a leader in Ethiopian coffee.

The next day was another one spent in the car, this time we were heading South, our destination being Hawassa. From Hawassa we would spend the next two days visiting the famed regions of Amaro and Yirgacheffe. Today at least we get to break up the drive with a visit to Ethiopia’s largest farmer’s union: the Oromia Coffee Farmers Cooperative Union or OCFCU. Farmers who are members of cooperatives can sell their coffee outside of the ECX system, which combined with plantations provide the only two ways to purchase traceable coffees from Ethiopia. Arriving at OCFCU, we are introduced to Tadesi—a legend in Ethiopian coffee. He founded OCFCU, and is its CEO. (He also was featured in the film “Black Gold”.) Tadesi gave us another overview of the entire Ethiopian coffee system. This refresher was helpful, because it is complex enough that working through it again helped clear up the confusion. He also went into detail about the Union. He expounded on the amount of production of the OCFCU and its growth over the past decade. The sheer numbers of producers is daunting, the membership numbering in the tens of thousands.

After Tadesi’s presentation, we toured the dry mill where they prepare coffee for export. We watched the women sort defects out of green coffee. After a bit, I decided to take an empty chair at the end of the sorting table. While I was pondering what it would be like to sort green coffee all day, I noticed one of the women was obviously tickled at the sight of me, sitting there sorting green coffee.   I smiled back at her, and tried to sort  the coffee a little more efficiently.

Sorting green coffee like a pro.

Sorting green coffee like a pro.

We raced the rest of the way to Hawassa, and managed to get to the hotel just as the sun was setting. It was thrilling to run out the back door in attempts to get the photo of the sunset over lake Awasa. (insert photo)

 

Day 6

Today was the day I had most looked forward to. We head to the Amaro Gayo Mill. This place had special significance to me, as we had purchased Natural processed coffee from this mill last year and I was planning to do so again this year, especially after we cupped the samples in Addis Ababa on day 1. To call Amaro Gayo a special coffee is an understatement, I think there is not another coffee like it in the world. The prospect of visiting the mill, and the woman responsible for this coffee had me tweaked. We stopped in the town of Yirgacheffe for coffee about 2 hours into driving. It was intriguing to get a glimpse of what we would be visiting the next day, another coffee holy site, as it were. However I was transfixed by Amaro Gayo. As we left Yirgacheffe we ascended over a range, and down into a large desert valley. We traveled another 1.5 hours on a dirt road through the desert, and I kept trying to see where we were headed—coffee does not grow in this climate! As we started to climb, the mountains on the other side of the valley it appeared, things started to get a little greener. Upon arriving at Amaro Gayo mill, I could see we were right at the boundary: everything below us was desert, everything above was green and lush. There was even a small river running down the mountain right next to the mill. We entered and were promptly introduced to Asnakech Thomas, the owner of Amaro Gayo. She in turn introduced us to her staff at the mill and showed us around the mill, while explaining their processes. Asnakech gave us a history of the mill, and the work she has been doing in Amaro, a small zone (think county) of the Southern Nations Nationalities and Peoples District (think state). Asnakech has a firm conviction that the coffee of Amaro is distinct from coffees of other regions. She explained how she has planted seedlings from other regions, and that they always die, and that “the coffee here must be different, just look at the desert around us.”  Asnakech is a woman of force, conviction and passion, an inspiring presence. She is driven by a mission to have the unique coffees of her region by recognized, and I would say she has achieved a fair deal of success with a sizable following for her coffee, and premium prices.

Harvest in the Square is Upon Us!

Getting ready for Harvest in the Square!

Getting ready for Harvest in the Square!

 

It’s that time again! Irving Farm is once again an excited part of Harvest in the Square, one of New York City’s most esteemed food events, and an integral part of supporting our Union Square community.

This will be the eighteenth year of this memorable evening that celebrates the finest chefs and foods surrounding Union Square Park, the neighborhood where Irving Farm began. Welcome in New York’s most beautiful season, fall, with this evening of exquisite food and drink pairings, music, and celebration.

Harvest in the Square
Tuesday, September 17, 2013
Enter from the South Plaza at 14th Street
Union Square Park, Manhattan

Ethiopia Diaries: Part I

Irving Farm’s Coffee Director, Dan Streetman, travelled to Ethiopia earlier this year as part of his ongoing coffee journeys. Here is the first installment of his adventures.

Ethiopia Tree

 

Ethiopia is the birthplace of coffee, the only place on Earth where it grows wild. Coffee professionals speak with hushed excitement about traveling to this “mythical” place. Most ordinary people also get fairly excited about the prospect of traveling to Africa as well, a continent best known for its wildlife, home to elephants, giraffes and lions.

I too was swept with excitement at the prospect of traveling to Ethiopia, but at this point in my job, traveling 30-45 days out of the USA per year, I generally love being at the destination, and much less the getting there part. About a week before I left, everyone I talked to was saying “OH! that is so exciting,” and all I could think was, “It is going to be 27 hours on a plane…” However by 5am at the Amsterdam airport I was starting to feel excited, and by the time we landed in Khartoum, Sudan, our last stop before Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, it had become a rush. 

St George Beer

St. George Ethiopian Beer

Two hours later we landed in Addis Ababa, and instantly my travel instincts started kicking in. Getting ready to clear customs, trying to ascertain how things were going to go etc. It turned out to be unnecessary: while looking disorganized, customs ran entirely smoothly, and I was let in without any hassle. My traveling partners and I had to wait for some other guests at the airport before catching the shuttle to the hotel, so we decided to grab a beer. There was only one choice, St. George.

 

Day 1
We headed to an export office, early in the morning, to meet our hosts and do some cupping. I was thrilled to bump into a colleague, Bruck, from my Q-cupper certification class. I had anticipated my first cupping in Ethiopia to be completely magical—I was hoping we would find many different coffees and new distinct profiles I had never tasted before. I knew that Ethiopia had several regions with which I was fairly unfamiliar, and was excited to see what these unknown coffees would taste like. It turned out to be less than magical—only the recognized regions delivered on their reputations. Overall, that first table was like many others I have experienced in other coffee-producing countries: even the pre-selected coffees proved to be mostly mediocre, some nice ones and only a few gems. I jotted down some notes, and asked about the rest of our travel itinerary. That afternoon we were going to visit the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange (ECX), a confusing and controversial element of the coffee trade in Ethiopia.

 

Ethiopian Commodities Exchange

Ethiopian Commodities Exchange

 

The ECX was launched in 2008, and was met with skepticism by specialty coffee roasters in the United States, and around the world. Mostly this was because coffee in the ECX is not traceable, as it is treated as a “commodity”. The idea behind the exchange is to drive transparent price discovery for types/qualities of coffee. Whereas specialty buyers wanted to buy specific lots from specific suppliers, rather than a commoditized regional “type.” The Exchange has several grades for all of its types, the most recognized being “Yirgacheffe,” “Sidamo” and “Harrar”, which are each regions of Ethiopia. We were not allowed to bring cameras into the building, but we were given a tour by an employee and shown the trade floor. Basically a group of buyers and sellers are locked in the octagon to do battle for an allotted time and bid on coffee. Deals are made when a buyer and a seller high-five to agree on the price. Whenever a deal is struck it is posted on a board over the floor for everyone to see the agreed price and quantity. The floor seems fairly calm until the last few minutes before the bell, and people start frantically trying to buy and sell. At this point I had a fairly rosy overview of how the Exchange worked, thanks to the cheerful employees who were very happy to tout its benefits. Although I was still confused about how the real coffee actually came in and then went back out of the Exchange: that confusion would linger until the end of the trip.

Day 2
The next day we set out for Keffa, a 12-hour drive from Addis Ababa which meant leaving at 6am, as we did not want to drive in the dark. My excitement of being in Ethiopia hadn’t worn off yet, even throughout the 12-hour ride, and even increased as we headed to Keffa, the forest where, the legend goes, coffee originally grew wild.  This in spite of the drive being the type you see on National Geographic complete with pot-hole ridden roads, where there were paved roads at all, baboons, and an endless supply of pedestrians and donkey carts willing to play Frogger. The last stretch of the drive was about 50km of red dirt roads, which were so loose you could literally not see the front of the car our the front window due to the dust kicked up.

Dust-blinded driving condtions.

Dust-blinded driving condtions.

If wasn’t still excited about being in Ethiopia, I was at least amped by the sheer adrenaline of driving in these conditions. We arrived just before dark, which meant a 2-hour journey to the coffee forest would put us there in almost pitch dark conditions.  Combined with the likelihood of seeing almost nothing, and being exhausted from all the traveling meant foregoing the lore, and just enjoying dinner in the hotel courtyard before retiring to bed early.

 

Day 3
I got up at 5:30am hoping for a shower before our 6:30 departure, but the water still wasn’t working from the night before. After breakfast we all piled back in the car, and drove about 2 hours to a farm called “LemKeffa” which is one of few plantations in Ethiopia. Less than one percent of farms here are plantations, defined as more than 30 hectares, and only plantations are allowed to sell to exporters directly. LemKeffa is owned by Addisu, a former cab driver in New York City. Addisu and I hit it off immediately, talking about New York, his time as a cab driver, his family in the US, and, ultimately, his farm. He moved back to Ethiopia about 10 years ago to purchase the farm, and hired an Agronomist farm manager about 5 years ago. Addisu’s farm is very representative of what we saw throughout most of Ethiopia, if a little better managed. We spent a good amount of time talking specifically about how farms are managed in Ethiopia, and about how the government encourages farmers to increase production.

Coffee Hotel in Keffa

Coffee Hotel in Keffa

Currently Ethiopia produces less than half the coffee per hectare compared to Central America. It is unclear exactly why, though Ethiopian farms have little to no access to fertilizers as they are prohibitively expensive. While most farm visits are fairly straightforward—walk through the trees, look around and take some pictures—walking Addisu’s farm was charged with an unusual energy. My excitement of seeing my first farm in Ethiopia, or even Africa, was part of it, but also my realization that even though I’m pretty good at recognizing the more common varieties of coffee tree, as I looked around the farm nothing looked familiar! Even knowing about the genetic diversity of coffee in Ethiopia, it was quite another thing to actually witness it.


After lunch, one of the ladies on Addisu’s farm demonstrated the Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony for us. (The ceremony involves roasting green coffee beans on a pan over coals, mashing them inside a hollowed out log with a large wooden mallet, and brewing them in a gourd-like vessel with boiling water, before being served.) Further demonstrating that coffee here is an integral part of the social fabric, following every meal, and all social gatherings.

 

Stay tuned for Part II of Dan’s Ethiopia Diaries!

We’re moving downtown! Now open at 88 Orchard Street.

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Join us in celebrating the opening of our fourth Manhattan cafe at 88 Orchard on the Lower East Side. This neighborhood cafe in one of the city’s most fascinating historic districts, for years known as simply 88 Orchard, has long been loved by the community, and has for more than a decade been a wonderful showcase for our coffees.

88 Orchard was one of Irving Farm’s first retail outlets to whom we wholesaled our coffee. When it came time for the cafe’s owners to choose a new direction in life, naturally, they turned to us to see if we’d like to take over the space. Naturally, we said yes!

We’re the official caretakers here now, and have spruced it up with the warm, fresh decor you’ve come to associate with Irving Farm, along with the same great coffees—and even more of them to choose from. We’ve added a Daily Single Origin batch brew, microlot coffee on Kalita pourover bar, and more! And we’re still serving wonderful sandwiches, bagels, baked goods and delicious local beer and wine.

Pay us a visit at the corner of Orchard and Broome today!

 

Farm to Farm Interview: Madava Farms’ Jacob Griffin

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Crown Maple and Madava Farms’ Jacob Griffin

 

In this first in a series of interviews by Irving Farm to the brilliant food and drink professionals we work in partnership with, we take a minute with Jacob Griffin, chef and Man Behind The Farm Stand at our Dutchess County, NY neighbors Crown Maple and Madava Farms.

 

Tell us about the Farm Stand at Madava Farms, and how it fits in with Crown Maple?
The Farm Stand at Madava Farms is our Café and visitor hub at the Sugarhouse. It is open year-round on weekends for lunch, tours, nature walks, private dinners and many other activities. I prepare a weekly menu utilizing our farm produce and other ingredients grown by local farms in the Hudson Valley.

The forests at Madava Farms produce our quality Crown Maple Syrup. When the sap stops running, the rest of the forest & farm come alive. We grow our own produce for The Farm Stand in our 6.5-acre chef’s garden. And just like our syrup, we work hard to produce unique and high quality fresh produce and turn it into great tasting food.

 

How did you get started in the food and beverage industry?
Like many chef stories begin, I was always cooking up my own creations at home as a child. However, mine began in the northern state of Alaska where the growing season is extremely short and the main entrée for many families is a moose-roast.

My first food and beverage position was for a catering company working front of the house my first year of college. It wasn’t long that I moved to the kitchen and started mixing baked goods and prepping food for our large events. The chef there pulled me aside one day and recommended I consider changing my major and going to culinary school.

With the help of my best friend, I applied and was accepted at the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York. This is where I began a career which opened up many amazing opportunities for this Alaskan.

 

What are you most excited about/interested in about what you guys are doing at Crown Maple and the Farm Stand?
At Madava Farms, I get to combine my two favorite things: sweets and local fresh produce. For many, sweets and veggies don’t always go together right away, but our maple syrup is the perfect natural sweet balancer. And better, the veggies come from our own garden right outside of our sugarhouse. If I run out of thyme or basil, I grab some shears and head out to the garden.

 

How does coffee fit into your menu?
Coffee fits in two ways: it is the last taste and aroma the guest experiences from a farm-fresh meal. The cup must be well-balanced, flavorful and leave your palate fresh and light in order to ensure a great meal.

Second is my Crown Maple Latte. It is perfect marriage of quality espresso & great maple syrup. I serve just as many maple lattes as I do coffees during the sugaring season.

I love using Irving Farm because they share the same characteristics we have for our syrup and food: sustainability, high quality standards and support of local businesses.

 

What coffee are you currently serving?
This season I selected the Santa Isabel – Guatemala. I chose this coffee because of its fresh earthiness in the aroma and aftertaste. It pairs well with our use of farm-fresh ingredients. I am also one of those people who can smell some of the oddest things in coffee, and this particular origin, I love the subtle taste of pumpkin seeds and multi-grains.

 

Thank you, Chef Griffin!

A Field Trip to Millerton

We couldn’t truly bridge the gap between the country and the city without interchange of ideas between our New York City cafes and the farmhouse roasting operations upstate in Millerton. We recently sent a field trip of lead baristas, including Liz Dean, from the big city up to Dutchess County to get some hands-on education in what it takes to bring amazing coffee to Hudson Valley, New York City, and beyond. Here are Liz’s impressions from our farm.

The team learning about roasting. Photo by Miguel Rios.

City kids learning about farmhouse roasting. Photo by Tamara Vigil.

 

Most of us who live in cities are far removed from the processes that go into producing what we consume, thanks in part to globalization and the industrialization of agriculture. While that’s widely considered an important and integral part of our societal development, this disconnect also creates a chasm in terms of understanding where and how our food—and in this case, our coffee—comes from. Which means, ultimately, that it can be hard to fully appreciate how much time, energy and love go into producing the cup of coffee you order in the morning and sip, bleary-eyed, as you set out for work.

In order to try and close the gap for our customers, a team of Irving Farm’s lead baristas—myself included—headed out to the farm where we roast our coffee, in Millerton, New York, just an easy two-hour train ride from the city. The purpose of our trip was to connect—or really, to reconnect—our work as baristas, to the work that goes into producing the coffee we serve.

We departed early from Grand Central Terminal—stopping for coffee at our location there, amid the rush of morning commuters, stern in their suits, and the hordes of teenaged European tourists all in matching T-shirts—and arrived at the expansive greenery of the Hudson Valley countryside.

Our roastmaster Clyde Miller greeted us at the train station in his pickup and drove us out to the farm. The actual roasting facilities are inside a renovated barn, and from the outside you’d have no idea what kind of wizardry and science was happening within those walls.

At the farm, Dan Streetman gave us a brief talk on the four phases of roasting, explaining how each of the phases affected the coffee physically and chemically in the process, and how they would affect the way the coffee ultimately tasted.

One of Dan’s jobs at Irving Farm is to select the coffees Irving Farm buys and roasts. He gets sent bags of sample coffees from all over the world, and he conducts small “sample” roasts to determine whether the coffee is something we’d like to carry. Dan let us choose from these bags of samples so that we would have a chance to roast coffee on our own, using the sample roaster.

I selected a bag of coffee from Yemen, only because I’d never had Yemeni coffee before. Some of the other baristas selected their sample coffee based on varietal, or processing style. Dan showed us how to roast on the sample roasters: how to let air in and out of the roaster to either quicken or slow the speed of roasting, and how to adjust the flame in order to control the temperature.

Roastmaster Clyde deep in thought. Photo by Miguel Rios.

Roastmaster Clyde deep in thought. Photo by Miguel Rios.

Much like in cooking or baking, there is an important balance between time and temperature—and there’s a line at which something becomes “overdone” and, regardless of the quality to begin with, not nearly as tasty as it could’ve been. Nearly all of Irving Farm’s coffees are roasted to the “sugar browning” phase, or what’s commonly considered a “medium roast”. Quite a few coffees in the world—and many that are used for espresso—make it all the way past “second crack” into the dry distillation phase (where it’s then considered a “dark roast”), and it’s in that territory that not very good coffee can be masked by the darkness of the roast, and where quality coffee can easily lose its more subtle flavors. When Dan and Clyde develop profiles for the coffees we roast, they find the right combination of measurements of time and temperature in order to draw out and produce a particular coffee’s best qualities. A lot of our coffees are light to medium roasts because they’ve found that those roasts are best at highlighting a coffee’s most outstanding features. The process is both an art and a science of precision.

Under Dan’s instructions, I monitored my little sample coffee carefully, checking the color of the beans with a long-handled spoon—listening for the “first crack”, almost like the sound of popcorn popping—and let it roast a little longer before quickly dumping it out to cool. Cooling is an important part of the process—once the coffee reaches its desired roast, it’s important to stop the roasting process at that point immediately. The whole process doesn’t take much more than 10 minutes, but it feels like a lot of work.

And yet, meanwhile, just steps away from me, Clyde goes about his business for the day, filling orders for the stores and for our wholesale accounts, roasting much larger quantities of coffee in the big Diedrich roaster and checking the process carefully on the computer, using data plotted out as a line graph to indicate the coffee’s roast profile. Later, Dan and Clyde will conduct cuppings to taste the coffees they’ve roasted in order to ensure consistency and quality.

Sample roaster at the farm. Photo by Miguel Rios.

Sample roaster at the farm. Photo by Miguel Rios.

The painstaking level of detail that goes into every step of this process is staggering. At the end of the day, holding a small bag of only a few ounces of coffee that I’d roasted felt like an accomplishment, and so to glance around the barn at the 100lb bags of coffee waiting to be roasted, or the huge bins of freshly roasted coffee, or the retail bags awaiting shipment, really drove home just how much energy and time went into the process of making coffee.

The next morning at work, I watched the caramel-colored drip of espresso into a cup and marveled at how small it seemed, how little there was to show for how much had gone into its production. It was kind of grounding, really, to be so aware of the fact that the coffee I held in my hand was simply the final step in a long process of changing hands, and of changing forms… from farm, to farm, to cup.

Having the chance to really experience this process firsthand lends a kind of beauty and honor to what otherwise seems like an ordinary ritual of having a cup of coffee in the morning before you start your day.

Nice is Nice, and so are Coffee People

The French Riviera beckons. Photo by Dan Streetman.

The French Riviera beckons. Photo by Dan Streetman.

Our Coffee Director, Dan Streetman, recently traveled to Nice, France, for the 2013 Specialty Coffee Association of Europe conference. While he wasn’t tanning on the beach, he took the time to meet with some coffee colleagues and producers and to judge some rigorous competitions. Here is his recap of the week.

The South of France might be one of the most universally exciting travel destinations in the world, especially in June. When I was invited to attend this year’s Specialty Coffee Association of Europe show, I jumped at the chance. Spending a week in the Riviera was just too enticing, even if it meant a week of trade show activities.

Arriving in France, the plane took a sweep off the coast of the city. Nothing but crystal azure water and terracotta roofs extending from the beach to the foothills in the distance. Even a view of the distant Alps made for quite the introduction. After dropping bags at the hotel and a quick breakfast, I headed over to the convention center for judges’ calibration for the World Latte Art and World Coffee in Good Spirits competitions. We do not conduct national competitions for these events in the United States, so I was especially interested to participate.

The next few days would prove to be a whirlwind of activity, just like every other trade show. I was observing SCAE education classes, judging Coffee in Good Spirits as a sensory judge and walking the show floor in between. I was a little skeptical about Coffee in Good Spirits—a contest involving signature drinks combining coffee and alcohol—because as a coffee purist I have never been a fan of people putting things in my coffee. However the drinks in the competition made me a believer, as all of them were far superior to anything I had tried before in the way of coffee cocktails. This was especially true of the drinks in the final round, with some especially delicious drinks.  France took home the crown with their competitor making a drink that included coffee, Cognac, and a cigar whose smoke was trapped under a cloche and released just before drinking.

Working with SCAE Education folks was equally rewarding, as being so heavily involved with the Barista Guild and SCAA espresso curriculum it is always nice to share war stories with another group that faces similar challenges.

The best surprise of the show however was running into a few of our friends from producing countries. Andres Salaverria, whose family owns the farms of Guadalupe and El Molino in El Salvador was in attendance to facilitate some cuppings at the show with their European clients Nordic Approach. It is always great to see Andres, and especially so when it is unexpected. He informed me that the farms are doing very well, and they have almost defeated the leaf rust scare, reducing the infection from 40% of the farms to 1%. This news came as quite a surprise to me, as there has not been any news like this out of Central America in regards to the leaf rust epidemic.  Andres explained however that careful pruning and a lot of management had been the secret to their success—along with favorable weather.

I was also lucky enough to see Omar Rodriguez, who is President of the Capucas Co-op. He was excited to hear that we had just received our coffees, and that we were looking forward to releasing them (our fresh crop of Capucas is now available). Omar also had surprisingly good reports in regards to leaf rust in regards to our other producers from Capucas: Jose Francisco and Jose Luis who own Los Plantanares and Los Lirios.

My third encounter was with Tsion Taye who was my guide in Ethiopia this year.  We chatted business briefly, and talked about the complexities of Ethiopia. I also got some advice on how to get some very exciting coffees for next year.

Judge Streetman rigging another contest...

Judge Streetman rigging another contest…

After the event, I was energized by the interactions of the show. Volunteering at these events always drives home that coffee is about people—particularly those people who  you may not even expect to run into but who make all the difference. Working and collaborating with these people is my favorite part of working in coffee.

 

I Scream, You Scream, We All Scream for Iced Pourover!

Iced Pourover

Liz Dean brewing Iced Pourover at our 79th Street Shop

Almost as if the calendar knew it, New York City heated up to its hot, muggy, worst summer self just as it turned late June. While there’s no cure for fifth-floor walkups and insufficient window air conditioners, we at Irving Farm are doing our best to offer the biggest anti-heat weapon we have in our arsenal: the iced pour-over coffee.

While many cafes offer batch-brewed cold coffee, we find the single-cup pourover method of brewing coffee directly over ice has more flavor.The nuance and acidity (that’s a good thing) naturally within each coffee is allowed to sparkle and shine in the iced pourover method—to you, this means a cup that’s both more flavorful and more refreshing. We do both our large-batch and hand-brew methods over ice, because we find it the most delicious method.

If you’d like to replicate our iced pour-over method at home, we bet you’ll find it delicious, too!

Here’s how to do it, using a standard pourover cone and decanter, or single-body brewer like the Kalita Wave:

Our process:
- Place 200g ice in the decanter
- 30g coffee (ground slightly finer than hot pour-over) in the filter
- Pour 60-70g hot water onto the coffee and allow to bloom for 1min then slowly pour the rest of the water up to 200g.
- Total Brew time should be 3min 30sec.
- Swirl and pour over a glass of ice!

You’re done!

 

 

 

A word about the Barista Guild of America

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Dan Streetman, Irving Farm’s Director of Coffee, is also outgoing Chair of the Barista Guild of America’s Executive Council. Here are a few words in parting.

This spring at the annual Specialty Coffee Association of America Expo, my term as Chair of the Barista Guild of America’s Executive Council came to an end. While I will still serve in an advisory role for the next year as “Past Chair,” it felt like a climactic moment. This was especially true during our annual post-expo Monday meeting—letting go of the reins proved to be difficult and tinged with emotion. It has been a supreme privilege to serve the Barista Guild membership, and especially to work with the other members of the Executive Council.

At the ripe age of 10 years, the Barista Guild is reaching maturity. It is exciting to see the growth in membership and engagement since I joined as a member in 2004. I initially became a member because at the time the Barista Guild forum was the place people were talking about coffee. Membership gave me a window into what was happening in many different parts of the country, and access to industry leaders. In 2008 I ran for a spot on the Executive Council because by then I had a full time job in coffee, and wanted to find ways to ensure that other people would have the opportunities I had to learn and grow into the industry through the Barista Guild. When I joined the Executive Council, the primary conversation about the Barista Guild was: why does it exist? Today the biggest question I hear is: How can I get involved?

The past year, 2012–13 was a year of growth for the Barista Guild, our first year seeing two of the signature Barista Camp events which continue to be huge successes. The only complaint seems to be: “do more of these and in more places.” Looking to the future, I pushed hard to improve the structure of the Barista Guild and its ability to achieve specific results. I am proud to say that the resulting by-law changes which expanded the Executive Council and solidified the development of working committees are a huge step in the direction of making the guild a more vibrant, and more responsive organization to the members, and to the industry. We needed to expand the Executive Council to continue to support the events and programs the Barista Guild has launched, and the working committees promise to be a vital way to expand programming and allow more members to get involved.

I can’t possibly take credit for everything the Barista Guild has accomplished over the past year, because there are so many dynamic leaders who are a part of the Executive Council. These leaders make me confident in the future of the organization and the professional craft. The Executive Council has big plans for the coming years, and I am excited to see that trajectory take shape and I hope to be able to continue to contribute to furthering the craft of specialty coffee. And congratulations on the incoming executive council: Miguel Vicuna, Laila Ghambari, Alexandra LittleJohn and Cole McBride. All of us in the Barista Guild and the coffee community at large look forward to reaping the benefits of your leadership.

Two Ethiopians are Twice as Nice!

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We love both these coffees for their characteristic silky body and abundance of fruit flavor. To encourage you to try both side by side, and explore the nuances of this historic coffee region, we’re offering $5 off with any $35 purchase now through 18 June 2013. Just use coupon code HI5ETH in the final step of checkout.

We hope you enjoy them as much as we do!

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AMARO GAYO, ETHIOPIA Asnakech is the only female mill operator in Ethiopia and we are proud to support her efforts at producing truly spectacular coffees by presenting to you her Amaro Gayo, a cup full of lush berry flavor, complex acidity and juicy body. Shop Now >

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YIRGACHEFFE, ETHIOPIA Coffees from this region receive the Yirgacheffe designation because they have been washed using a traditional Ethiopian process developed to improve quality. This process helps remove defects, and leads to a clean, citrus-like flavor profile for which Yirgacheffe is known. Shop Now >

 

 

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