Postcards from MANE

MANE relaxing.
Taking a load off at MANE. Photos by Joshua Littlefield.

“The experience I gained at MANE is invaluable. During those three days, I was able to attend several courses, including a cupping with winning farms from Rwanda/Burundi. What I realized is that Cup of Excellence isn’t always exactly what you’d expect (i.e. we tasted lots of potato defects.) What I also learned is the importance of quality control and thinking through the aspects of sensory analysis. Nevertheless, the true highlights for me were hearing George Howell’s speech on the ability to thrive and learn about what seems to be the never-ending science of coffee. What was also wonderful to see were the abundance of varietals and cultivars in a class given by Matt Brown of Cafe Imports. Given this experience, I have tremendous gratitude for the opportunity to be able to go to MANE. And I’m looking forward to sharing this newfound knowledge at Irving Farm!

— Kai, 71 Irving Place

 

Teresa training and MANEing.
Teresa training and MANEing.

“I had so much fun at MANE and was so happy to have had the opportunity to go! The thing that stood out to me the most was being able to see all the different paths that you could go within coffee. From growers to buyers, baristas and sales reps, the coffee community itself is a very large but connected community. At the “How Did They Get Here” panel, all of the coffee professionals talked about how they started out, mostly barista jobs but not looking to stay in coffee. No matter how many times they left coffee, because of personal lives, financial reasons, or relocating, they always somehow found their way back to the coffee. They all seemed to have a true passion for coffee not just in their jobs but in their own lives. My favorite class I took was deconstructing espresso machines. There, I gained a whole new respect for the machines and the techs that work on them after finding out just how electrical and explosive the machines really are. It also gave me a better understanding of their internal mechanics and how each part works. MANE was a great experience and it helped me to better understand just how big the coffee world is. I am so greatful and thankful to have gone with such an amazing team. And even though the po-po shut down the latte art throwdown, they couldn’t keep us from killin it on the dance floor.”

— Hannah, Millerton Coffee House

Tamara tearing up the floor at MANE.
Tamara tearing up the floor at MANE.

“I became a barista originally because I just needed a job to make money, and about a year ago I actually tried to leave because I thought it was time for me to grow up and get a ‘real’ job. But one of the things that had stuck out to me during my time at Irving Farm—and what eventually brought me back—was the strong sense of community and family. Working for Irving Farm, as a barista, was actually one of the few times in my professional life that I had felt truly supported, respected, and cared for by the people I worked with. And it was that sense of community, and sense of family, that beckoned my return to being a barista. I can’t think of many other people I know who work in a profession where they have such a strong and immediate bond with others in their field. Since then I’ve learned that that sense of community, and general spirit of camaraderie, extends beyond Irving Farm into the coffee community at large. Having the opportunity to go to events like MANE, and being able to meet and connect with so many people all united by a common passion, and who all seem genuinely and earnestly excited about sharing that passion with other likeminded folks, is truly remarkable. MANE is particularly wonderful for folks more newly joining the coffee scene to get a sense of what’s out there. It’s a smaller event, and less expensive to participate in than some bigger events, so it’s not as daunting of a commitment to go to for anyone in the Northeast who works in the coffee industry. There are just enough people there so that you run into a few familiar faces, but you still meet and exchange ideas with many new ones as well. There was a class or panel for everyone, whether you were a roaster, barista, coffee shop manager, or just someone interested in coffee. One of my favorite classes was on the “flavor wheel”—a comprehensive chart developed to categorize aromas and tastes in coffee. And it was amazing to learn that despite the fact that coffee has been around for a very long time, the science of tasting coffee is still an emerging field, and there’s still a lot to learn and discover. Another class I really enjoyed was on espresso extraction. In that class, we split into small groups and had to dial in a coffee—that we knew nothing about beforehand—to try and optimize the taste of the espresso and drawing out its best qualities in the shot. We played around with dose, time, and grind to see how each of these variables affected the way the espresso tasted. We were delighted to find that the settings we were most happy with matched, almost exactly, the description the coffee roaster had printed on the bag! On the last day of the event, there was a panel featuring a variety of speakers who’d found ways to take their passion for coffee and turn it into a career, which really hammered home the significance of being there. These were people who were once where I was—passionate but still uncertain—and who had taken what they loved and what they were good at, and made it into a meaningful career. Listening to them helped me connect all of the new information I’d gleaned from classes and all of the sharing and exchanges I’d had with different people, and helped me see the myriad possibilities I had for my future in coffee. Which is really, really exciting. I’m looking forward to more opportunities like MANE where I can learn new things and share in new creative ideas with other people who are as passionate and enthusiastic about their work in coffee as I am.
— Liz, 79th & Broadway